i have actually seen many world talk around vlans and also their router configuration and also as castle keep stating this ip subnet of 192.168.1.x/24 - than i don"t gain it. Ns am simply a beginner right into networking side. Ns have regulated house routers, switches both managed and also unmanaged, hubs yet I never ever play around with the setups i do not know. For this reason in one of the switches i observed it verified me a ar to go into something favor 192.168.1.x/24 deserve to someone give me details top top this :)Thanks.
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Born2Frag
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Joshua_B wrote:

But a 10.0.0.0/24 is not a course C network. Kimberlin wrote:

A /24 can be a course C network, however not every /24"s are. For example, 10.1.1.0/24 is no a course C. Ns am just making the argument that if a network is expressed in CIDR, it have to not be called a class anything. 

Classless CIDR notation is pretty much the share now. Class based subnet borders as identified by RFC791 are not used really often.

You are watching: How many hosts can you have with a subnet of 192.168.1.0/28?

People usage the terms "Class C" (/24) and "Class B" networks (/16) when in fact they are using classless CIDR yet are talking about a IP deal with block that offers the course C and Class B organize bit boundaries. For example taking the 10.0.0.0/8 course A exclusive network space and chopping that up into /24 or /16 blocks. Even though they room not true class C or class B networks, they usage the same organize bit border (24 bit or 16 bit). Prefer in your instance 10.1.1.0/24 is making use of a "Class C" 24 bit organize boundary top top a segment that the RFC1918 10.0.0.0/8 private resolve space.


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Mace
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Magnus369 january 8, 2013 in ~ 03:16 UTC

It"s describing the number of bits in the netmask.

192.168.1.0 netmask 255.255.255.0, or together a bit field, 11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000

anything the fits the mask is component of the regional subnet, anything the doesn"t demands to walk to the gateway because that routing. You"ll keep in mind 255.255.255.0, or it"s bit ar representation, has actually 24 1"s, thus the /24. A /8 would certainly be 255.0.0.0 or 11111111.00000000.00000000.00000000- the /# is simply a simpler method of note the netmask. And since the netmask is constantly contiguous, friend will constantly know that a /8, or a /9 or what have you is always the exact same no issue what the ip plan is that"s in use.

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Jalapeno
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Phil (ISON) jan 8, 2013 at 03:18 UTC

Brand Representative for ISON, LLC


192.168.x.x is part of the network space collection aside for exclusive networking. The private networks are defined in RFC 1918. The Internet engineering Task force (IETF) in reality sums it up pretty fine in the start of the RFC 1918 document. ( bring away from: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1918 ) 

"This document describes address allocation for exclusive internets. Theallocation permits complete network class connectivity amongst all hostsinside one enterprise also as among all public hosts of differententerprises."

The level language variation is the three networks listed in the RFC are not component of the publicly routed Internet and can be offered internally come segment public from private networks. This is why you normally see it in network tutorials and diagrams because it is meant for inner use and isn"t likely to cause a routing problem if an internet dealing with router or firewall is configured with it.

The 3 networks collection aside are:

10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix)172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 (172.16/12 prefix)192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 (192.168/16 prefix)