I was reasoning... according to code they imply a maximum of 12 lights or outlets per circuit, or 80% of the pack of 15 amp circuit... idk if I am gaining perplexed here but I am planning to use slimled 9w 120v lights, 80% of the fill is 12 amps which is approx 1440 watts.. I am looking to put about 22 lights throughout entire basement through a few switches... each light according to my math would certainly be 9w or 0.075 amps.. so technically I could put all of these lights onto 1 circuit ? in Canada btw.

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The codes have not really caught up via the LED lights yet , I think you are fine as long as these are light fixtures through a Led diode and also not an LED bulb that might be rerelocated and also replaced through a different kind of bulb. Wait and check out what Aaron and Wayne need to say on this.
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Yeah in the NEC code for the US, tright here actually is no limit to the variety of outallows (which refers to both lights and receptacles) per branch circuit. You need to make the load calculation yourself. I think Canada CSA code does have actually a limit on the number of outallows per branch circuit - it might be 12 as you say, Wayne would recognize for sure. Either means, you shouldn"t assume that the lights will certainly always be LED. I would certainly still wire the circuits through the presumption that an old-fashioned 100W incadescent might be screwed in to the socket.Shannon"s right that the codes haven"t caught up through LEDs. I think it still adheres to a kind of worst-instance scenario for high-wattage lights.
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Jmaclicious wrote:I was thinking... according to code they imply a maximum of 12 lights or outlets per circuit, or 80% of the fill of 15 amp circuit... idk if I am acquiring confused here however I am planning to usage slimled 9w 120v lights, 80% of the fill is 12 amps which is approx 1440 watts.. I am looking to put around 22 lights throughout entire basement with a few switches... each light according to my math would certainly be 9w or 0.075 amps.. so technically I could put every one of these lights onto 1 circuit ? in Canada btw.
If your circuit has actually ONLY lighting, then you are not bound to the "12" gadgets dominance.As Shannon shelp, you have to calculate the wattage of the fixture, not the light. ie. if the fixture says maximum 100Watts ... that"s what you have to calculate.Many of the newer LEDs (do not accept traditional bulbs) are rated very low .... so you deserve to put A LOT of them on the circuit.If you put even 1 receptacle on this circuit ... you"re back at the 12 max devices thou !
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With AFCIs being required now in a lot of areas it make sense to save lighting circuits and receptacle circuits separated IMO.
Yes, agreed... I would certainly constantly store lighting separate from receptacles. That method you have the freedom to have actually simply 2 or three lighting circuits in your whole house, and also run them in via low-cost 14/2.I can see some time later wbelow we may even run LED-exclusive lighting circuits through 16/2 or even 18/2, connected to a 10A or 5A breaker.
Shannon wrote:With AFCIs being essential now in most locations it make feeling to save lighting circuits and also receptacle circuits separated IMO.
Many males are wiring that method now. Saves on an AFCI breaker ... additionally, smoke detectors have to be run off a lighting circuit. If that circuit has AFCI, you either should run a separate circuit to it, or have the smoke det via battery backup.
I think smoke/CO detectors need to have their own dedicated plain breaker via 14/3 run from the panel to the first detector and daisy-chained to each one dvery own the line. You need that 3rd red conductor for alarm interconnection. The red wire stays stubbed in the breaker panel for future add-on alarm interlink.
Aaron wrote:I think smoke/CO detectors must have actually their own dedicated simple breaker with 14/3 run from the panel to the first detector and also daisy-chained to each one down the line. You require that third red conductor for alarm interconnection. The red wire stays stubbed in the breaker panel for future add-on alarm interlink.
I believe they are generally put on a lighting circuit so that if the breaker trips for some reason you will certainly be mindful of it sooner and acquire the difficulty addressed . If they are on tright here very own and tripped the breaker for some stvariety factor you may not even realize it and they will certainly not be set off.

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Oh, that"s actually a very excellent allude.Most modern ones will sound or display screen an alarm or something if they do not have actually AC power, and also I think all AC-wired ones have a 9V battery backup. But yeah, they take hardly any kind of AC power at all so tapping them off a light circuit is actually not a bad principle and also really nudges the homeowner to take treatment of the circuit rather than just ignoring it--as people tend to do.